Curren$y performed a ‘dope’ set at his 4/20 show.

I hate standing in lines for any amount of time, so I was S.O.L. Wednesday night (4/20) at the Curren$y show, because the line at Warehouse Live was wrapped around the building and down the street by 8 o’clock for the 9:30 show. Thank God for press passes, because after I got in and secured my spot, I looked up and the sold-out show was filled to the door with concertgoers ready to hear one of the few rappers still representing the Dirty South sound, Curren$y.

DJ Mr. Rogers started the show by coming to the stage and asking who all was high. Naturally, plenty of concertgoers had already been celebrating the “holiday” and proudly raised their hands.

Doughbeezy, a surprise guest to one of the opening acts before Curren$y's set.

Doughbeezy, a surprise guest to one of the opening acts before Curren$y’s set. (Photo: J. Wallace)

Spitta brought quite a few friends with him, among which were some familiar faces: Doughbeezy, Le$, Tim Woods, Rocky Banks (who, if you haven’t heard, doesn’t do drugs anymore), Gunna, and Baby Bash, along with some newer (to me, and quite a few others, at least) faces like Arab Yo , Murda, and T.Y.

Tim Woods donning his usual flower crown as he opens for Curren$y.

Tim Woods donning his usual flower crown as he opens for Curren$y. (Photo: J. Wallace)

Although the lineup was packed with artists of whom most of us had never heard, I think we were all pleasantly surprised with the fact that no one sucked. I, personally, was geeked to see Curren$y’s female DJ, DJ Duffey, hit the stage because girl power. She was in tune with him the whole night, often stopping the tracks so he could flow acapella.

DJ Duffey, Curren$y's DJ, held it down for girl power and kept the sounds coming all night.

DJ Duffey, Curren$y’s DJ, held it down for girl power and kept the sounds coming all night. (Photo: J. Wallace)

The concert – held on 4/20 – was not for the faint of lung, and I, a sober island, watched as blunts quite literally swirled around my head all night. The strongest of us stood our ground, but the crowd grew visibly smaller throughout the night as people either went to schleep, or stepped outside to get some fresh air and couldn’t regain their positions in the crowd. The air (literally) in the venue certainly contributed to the unenthused atmosphere. I felt bad for some of the openers as crowd participation was almost impossible for an audience in that state – if you weren’t blazed when you got there, you were when you left, even if you didn’t smoke. Artists consistently threw water bottles out into the audience and looked to see if every was OK, as there were apparently some casualties at Curren$y’s last show.

Curren$y’s (too short) set took me back to my days in college at LSU, when he was still that semi-underground rapper (just ended ties with Cash Money) who was releasing local mixtapes. It was pretty cool to see a packed house, knowing the small beginnings from whence he came. Everyone knew all the lyrics to every song, and everyone’s phones and eyes lit up when they heard “Everybody put your jets up!” It was one of the only times the audience came out of its fog (besides a failed attempt at a “Curren$y” chant) and became lively. Heads nodded in unison, the audience used what little space around them they had to sway or do a tiny two-step as Curren$y ran the stage hype-man-less. It was brilliant of him to stop the music as frequently as he did and spit acapella, giving us the underground vibe we grew to know from his music, and also giving us a better listen of that familiar lisp. He also showed his appreciation for Houston, which we always love, and even went as far as to shout out the guy who paints his lowriders, Sic.

Curren$y finally hit the stage, killed it, and left us in the smoke.

Curren$y finally hit the stage, killed it, and left us in the smoke. (Photo: J. Wallace)

Will I attend a Curren$y concert again? Not on 4/20, but I definitely will. It was cool to feel like I was a part of his comeuppance, and to get to hear a real, Dirty South rapper was refreshing after the endless Drake and Future marathons we hear on our radio stations.

When you find a good thing you usually tend to want to keep it to yourself, and I do, but I also want a resurgence of the Dirty South/504 sound (where you at, Wayne?!), and I want the best for Curren$y. By the size of the crowd at Warehouse Live on a Wednesday night, and the fact that his latest album, Canal Street Confidential, has features by charting artists like August Alsina, Chris Brown, and Future, means I won’t get to keep him to myself. If you get a chance to experience a show live, I would 100% recommend you take it.